Create Awareness

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Awareness starts with….you
 

Who are you?  Let’s start by looking at your Bio, your website and all of the written materials you send out.  

Do they really tell your story?

Everyone has a story to tell but not everyone knows how to tell that story.

I’m told by highly respected industry veterans that there is still a place for the long bio that tells all the places you’ve performed, all the awards you’ve won, and the prestigious places you’ll perform this season. So, it’s probably a good idea to have a “Presenter’s Bio.”  But, they aren’t your audience. Your audience wants to know more about you. What should they know?  

You tell me, and then let’s put it out there…everywhere it matters, including nontraditional avenues.

 
 

 
 

Get your CD heard
 

You sent out your CD, and it was received by someone who gets 50 – 100 CDs a month. How do you get it out of CD Mountain and in the smaller priority listening stack?

I will serve as your personal Radio Airplay Representative. 

I know, or will quickly learn your music.  I know what radio programmers are looking for to serve their audience. I will engage and excite radio programmers about your new releases in a way that will encourage air play.

Since all art is personal, I will help you develop friendships with radio station programmers and announcers.  Friends help friends, and I have a set of plans for you to become a regular musical voice on radio stations.

If interested, I would also make the case for your earlier recordings that might not have received the attention they deserved. (They might not even have your earlier CDs.)

My approach is different than many of the current PR pros and PR firms that promote new CDs.  They do a fine job.  I will only advocate for a limited number of artists at one time.  In that way, I will talk to the right number of people at length, and put all of my efforts into advocating one recording, or one set of recordings, at a time. 

Remember, almost no one reads press releases any more. One-on-one contact is better, especially if there’s a plan for your new CD that goes beyond telling programmers you have a new recording.